Health Effects of Radiation:
5 Themes
Effects on Fetuses and Hereditary Effects

(iii) Hereditary effects

Next, let’s take a look at the results of hereditary effects research.
There has been no evidence to prove that parents' radiation exposure increases hereditary diseases in their offspring in the case of human beings.

Results of the next-generation health effect studies of the children of atomic bomb survivors

Surveys of health effects on children of atomic bomb survivors examine incidence rates of serious congenital disorders, gene mutations, chromosome aberrations, and cancer, as well as mortality rates from cancer or other diseases. However, no significant differences were found between the survey targets and the individuals with no exposure with the same classification for attributes such as gender, age, and residence area (control group) for any of these categories.

For more information about the results of surveys of health effects on children of atomic bomb survivors, see page 103 of Vol. 1, FY2017 edition.

Other epidemiological surveys of the children of atomic bomb survivors

Deaths from leukemia or possibly hereditary tumors, etc. developed by the age of 20

The follow-up survey of 41,066 subjects revealed no correlation between parents' gonadal doses (0.435 Sv on average) and their children's deaths.

(Source: Y. Yoshimoto et al.: Am J Hum Genet 46: 1041-1052, 1990.)

Deaths from cancer (1958 - 1997)

As a result of the follow-up survey of 40,487 subjects, development of solid tumors and blood tumors was found in 575 cases and 68 cases, respectively, but no correlation with parents' doses was observed (the survey is still underway).

(Sourse:S. Izumi et al.: Br J Cancer 89: 1709-13, 2003.)

Incidence rates of lifestyle-related diseases (2002 - 2006)

The clinical cross-sectional survey of approx. 12,000 subjects revealed no correlation between parents' doses and their children's incidence rates of lifestyle-related diseases (the survey is still underway).

(Source:S Fujiwara et al.: Radiat Res 170: 451-7, 2008.)

For more information about survey results, see page 106 of Vol. 1, FY2017 edition.

Health Effects of Radiation: 5 Themes