National Parks of Japan Protecting our natural heritage for future generations

Nasu, KashiNikko National Park

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A royal forest resort
Nasu Heisei-no-mori Forest is part of the Nasu Imperial Villa that was transferred from the Imperial Household Agency to the Ministry of the Environment. Loved as a place to connect with nature, it is home to many rare plants and animals that live or are raised in the forest. The Nasukashi area is characterized by a dynamic landscape shaped by the gentle highlands below the Nasu Mountain Range and valleys carved out by rivers, creating a mosaic of mountains and forests. The beauty of its four seasons is unparalleled. Also, there are many ways to enjoy Nasukashi’s abundant hot springs, including hot spring inns deep in the forest and old bathhouses steeped in history.
A royal forest resort
Beautiful scenery in the midst of nature
There are still large stands of primeval forests remaining in the Nasukashi area. These woodlands offer ample opportunities for you to connect with nature along trails where you can listen to the warbling of various wild birds beneath the Mongolian oaks and beeches or stroll through blooming colonies of azaleas. The smoldering active volcano, Mt. Chausu, and the activity of earth has also long bestowed many benefits upon the local people. With magnificent mountains and expansive forests flowing with crystal streams, in the Nasukashi area, you can truly experience the awe-inspiring beauty of nature.
Beautiful scenery in the midst of nature
Trace the footsteps of the poet Basho and visit the land of legends
Many legends surround the local area, which long prospered as a hub connecting Oshu Province to larger cities and Edo. The Shikanoyu legend tells of a white deer that led a hunter to an undiscovered hot spring. The Yugyo Yanagi legend is about a wandering priest who transformed the spirit of a willow tree appearing as an old man into a Buddha. The legend of Sesshoseki tells of an evil nine-tailed fox felled by being turned to stone, yet continues to emit poison where it rests. Haiku poet Basho wrote about the eerie scene at Sesshoseki in his book Oku no Hosomichi. Many sites that attracted such literary figures still remain today.
Trace the footsteps of the poet Basho and visit the land of legends