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Mt. Daisen Mountain Climbing Course

Mt. Daisen Mountain Climbing Courseの写真
Type:
Mountain Climbing
Time Required:
6 h
Distance:
8.2 km
Gaze over the Sea of Japan from Mt. Daisen, the highest mountain in the Chugoku region.

Course Outline

This course takes you along the Natsuyama Trail to the peak of Mt. Misen at the summit of Mt. Daisen. At 1,729 meters, Mt. Daisen is the highest mountain in the Chugoku Region and is site of one of the largest beech forest in western Japan. Worshiped as a sacred mountain for hundreds of years, the traditional pilgrimage route still remains intact today. Take the route through the beech forest to reach the shelter at the 6th station from which you can see the north face of Mt. Daisen and the peak of Sankoho. From the 8th station, a boardwalk leads you through a community of Japanese yew to the summit, where on a fine day, a splendid view of the Sea of Japan and the Shimane Peninsula awaits. Heading down the mountain, take the route toward Ogamiyama Shrine Okunomiya from the Gyojadani trail fork, which will bring you back via the stone path. Once you finish your climb, you can relax in the hot spring facility just off of the path to Daisen-ji Temple.
* The only toilet facilities along the Mt. Daisen mountain path are located at the shelter huts on the summit of Mt. Misen and at Motodani. Please be sure to use the toilet before beginning the climb.

Highlights

One of the largest beech forest in western Japan
One of the largest beech forest in western Japan

Passing through the vibrant green beech forest

Head toward the summit passing through western Japan's one of the largest beech forest. As you trek along the trail on the way to Mt. Daisen's summit, the tunnel of vibrant foliage formed by the forest canopy—emerald green spring through summer and golden in the fall—has the power to soothe the body and spirit. Beech trees can store so much water that they are known as the "dams of the forest", and even the humus formed from their fallen leaves can hold water from rain and melting snow. It takes 20 to 30 years until the stocked water is released back into the ground. Filled with nutrients, it enriches the fields and rice paddies as it flows toward the sea.

Mt. Daisen's Japanese yew community
Mt. Daisen's Japanese yew community

The Japanese yew community around the 8th station

As you climb up the boardwalk near Mt. Daisen's 8th station, the trail levels out into a thriving community of Japanese yew. The trees stand only a few meters high and have been designated as a National Natural Monument.

The view from the summit
The view from the summit

Looking over the Sea of Japan from the summit of Mt. Daisen

As long as the weather cooperates, the summit of Mt. Daisen offers a panoramic view of the Yonago Plain, the Shimane Peninsula, and the Yumigahama Peninsula's arching coastline. In the evening, you can also see a stunning sunset beyond Nakanoumi and Lake Shinji. During the summer, you can get a commemorative climbing badge at the shop in the summit hut.

Course Map

Mt. Daisen Mountain Climbing Course

Course Time

Starting Point
1
Bakuroza Parking Lot
15 min.
0.6 km
2
Natsuyama Trailhead
80 min.
1.5 km
3
Gyojadani Trail Fork
20 min.
0.2 km
4
6th Station Shelter
80 min.
1.2 km
5
Summit of Mt. Daisen
60 min.
1.2 km
6
6th Station Shelter
10 min.
0.2 km
7
Gyojadani Trail Fork
70 min.
1.8 km
8
Ogamiyama Shrine Okunomiya
20 min.
0.9 km
9
Daisen Hino-kamidake Onsen Guoen-Yuin
5 min.
0.6 km
10
Bakuroza Parking Lot
Terminus
*Course time and distance are estimates.